TRAILER REVIEW: Kesari

Akshay Kumar stars in another historical war film that tells the story of the Battle of Saragarhi fought in 1894 where 21 Sikh soldiers fought against 10000 Afghan invaders
TRAILER REVIEW: Kesari
Akshay Kumar

The long awaited trailer of Kesari has finally been released by Dharma Productions. The film stars Akshay Kumar and Parineeti Chopra and is directed by Anurag Singh.

Anurag Singh has previously directed Jatt and Juliett series and this is his first foray into the war/epic genre.

The trailer begins with a message of peace where Akshay Kumar speaks about building a mosque. Akshay plays a Sikh soldier named Hawaldar Ishar Singh who mans 21 soldiers against 10000 Afghan soldiers.

Scheduled to release on March 21, the film’s trailer boasts of a powerful story but the scale of the film seems entirely too dependent on CGI and Akshay Kumar’s rich baritone. The trailer is completely narrated by Akshay himself. The soundtrack is impressive and manages to create the desired impact as thousands of soldiers dispersing with bomb attack from the Sikh regiment. Akshay’s quip towards the end of the trailer, “Chall jhoota!” is the highlight of the trailer.

Kesari otherwise seems like another attempt to glorify war and patriotism with nothing fairly new to offer. Parineeti appears only twice: once laughing at something that Hawaldar Ishar Singh has said and once smiling at his actions. The Afghan representative doesn’t sound look or sound like anyone from Afghanistan except that he is wearing a turban that the Pashtun tribesmen would most likely were to wear in that era.

The storytelling is fairly linear and there is a clear lack of variety in the landscape. 

Watch the trailer here

Understandably the film is based on the events that transpired in the Battle of Saragarhi and the scenes would most likely be limited to the Saragahi village. But everything is a little too plain, too dusty and fairly colorless. Even Parineeti’s avatar is devoid of a varying palette. Perhaps it is done for the sake of consistency in theme but for a Hindi film that runs for over two hours, the pale yellow is going to get tiring very soon. And mind you, it’s not even something like Mad Max where the cinematography blends into the action and evolves or shifts in its tone as the story progresses.

Comments