South Indian Remakes That Were Bollywood Successes

South Indian Remakes That Were Bollywood Successes

The most successful remakes of South Indian films are Baaghi 2 and Simmba. They made a whopping ₹101 cr and ₹100 cr, respectively. The rights for a South Indian hit range from ₹1.5-3 crore
South Indian Remakes That Were Bollywood Successes
Baaghi 2 and Simmba

The most successful remakes of South Indian films are Baaghi 2 and Simmba. They made a whopping ₹101 cr and ₹100 cr, respectively. The rights for a South Indian hit range from ₹1.5-3 crore. They are known for their amusing, gripping and sensitive storylines. Thus, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada movies have provided an abundance of content for Hindi film storylines. In the preceding 10 years, data has revealed that Bollywood has re-created 38 south Indian films. Out of these 38, 18 have been hits. Some of these hits include:  Tiger Shroff’s Baaghi 2 (a re-creation of Telugu movie Kshanam), Ranveer Singh’s action comedy Simmba (Telugu film Temper) and Salman Khan’s action romantic comedy Bodyguard (Malayalam film) rank highest on the list. The profits, respectively are, ₹101 crore, ₹100 crore and ₹74 crore.

In the last decade, Ajay Devgn acted in 6 films alone. Those hits are: SinghamSon of SardaarHimmatwalaAction JacksonSingham ReturnsDrishyam. As for Akshay Kumar, his South Indian hit remakes include: Gabbar Is BackHolidayBoss, Rowdy Rathore, Khatta Meethaand De Dana Dan. According to independent trade analyst Sreedhar Pillai: “Films have to be commercially viable and it always makes sense to remake a film that is a proven hit, plus, all the movies that have been remade have had universal content and emotions that could work on a pan-India scale."

Film specialists are of the opinion that South Indian cinema has perfected the art of creating commercially feasible conventional entertainment while maintaining elements of drama and emotions, a method Bollywood is yet to crack. This analysis comes after the failure of expected blockbuster such as Thugs of Hindustan and Kalank. In a recent interview, Kabir Singh director of Vanga had said that “while the Hindi movie industry was doing well in terms of scripts until five years ago, things have become a little stale now and the uncommon treatment (of these south Indian films) is a bonus.”

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