Relationships and Attachment: Here’s What You Need to Know

Relationships and Attachment: Here’s What You Need to Know

Four relational patterns most common to people with poor attachment styles
Relationships and Attachment: Here’s What You Need to Know

Attachment is a natural phenomenon – it is part of every human relationship. People may not be aware of how deeply connected attachment styles are with individual’s mental health but it has the capability of dictating every relationship.

Here are four relational patterns most common to people with poor attachment styles:

Becoming too close too soon:

A relationship that starts too rough or too friendly and ends up in flames. While its okay to connect with people and enjoy an immediate connection but red flags are raised when someone becomes too emotional too fast with even a shallow engagement with strangers.

Being clingy, not loving:

A clingy person may come across as loving or concerned. Although love can be very strong between people but healthy relationship is developed over time and is not blinded by shallow attractions such as physical appearance, style etc. A needy person is usually trying to fulfil their needs with a relationship but is never satisfied. They are starving for a connective and are obsessed with the idea of a relationship rather than the relationship itself.

Overidentifying with strangers:

Some individuals find themselves attached to strangers when shown the slightest amount of attention. It may lead to them believing that every individual they cross paths with may be deeper than it actually is. They see connections where there are none and overestimate people’s emotions.

Going to great lengths to be close to anyone they think has positive influence:

Sometimes people tend to overly connect with people who with perceived power. Individuals feel a link with those who hold some kind of power – that power is often perceived and not real. It could also lead into romantic attractions. The individual may mistake generic friendship as love or affection. Individuals with this kind of relational view often become stalkers.

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