Meray Paas Tum Ho, Episode 2: A “Love” Triangle Begins

Meray Paas Tum Ho, Episode 2: A “Love” Triangle Begins

Hamayun Saeed and Ayeza Khan starrer “Meray Paas Tum Ho” finds the 3rd point in the triangle with Adnan Siddiqui’s entry
Meray Paas Tum Ho, Episode 2:  A “Love” Triangle Begins
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Meray Paas Tum Ho is a multi-starrer with the likes of Hamayun Saeed, Ayeza Khan, Adnan Siddiqui, Hira Mani and Mehar Bano in important roles.  While these characters are being introduced slowly, the star cast itself makes the show one worth watching.  While episode 1 focused entirely on Danish (Hamayun Saeed) and Mehwish (Ayeza Khan) with only one scene featuring Anoushey (Mehar Bano), episode 2 introduces a new, major character played by Adnan Siddiqui.  This character will have a major impact on Danish and Mehwish’s relationship in coming episodes.

Episode 2 focuses mostly around Mehwish (Ayeza Khan) and her relationship with Anoushey (Mehar Bano), a friend who is seemingly a negative influence on Mehwish, though it doesn’t seem as though she tries to be.  Rather, Anoushey seems to be from the “elite class” and, in her presence, Mehwish realizes what she is lacking in her life.  While shopping for Anoushey’s brother’s wedding, Mehwish spontaneously decides to buy the necklace she has been eying and borrows the money from Anoushey.  At the same time, Danish has taken a loan to purchase the necklace for his wife and comes home to surprise her but discovers that she is out – and she remains out for the majority of the evening.  During this outing, Mehwish meets Shahwar (Adnan Siddiqui), a married man with somewhat of an open marriage.  Shahwar is instantly attracted to Mehwish, making his interest known.  When Mehwish returns home, upon seeing that she has purchased the necklace, Danish gives Mehwish the money to pay Anoushey back and silently returns the necklace he purchased.

Danish is willing to go to any length to please his wife, even if it goes against his values and principles.  He is soft in his love and possessive regarding his wife.  He declares to his prying neighbor that he does not like things that have been used by others, making a statement not only about the purchasing of a used car, but also making a statement to stay away from his wife.  Danish “kicks his father in his grave,” a dramatic statement made by Danish regarding his decision to begin taking bribes for the sake of his wife’s happiness in order to bring in more money.  Principled, Danish is willing to bend over backwards and do anything for his wife, even break those principles.  This love will suffer soon enough, as Danish is being portrayed as the doting, loving character on this show in stark contrast to his loving, but materialistic (and rather selfish) wife Mehwish.  What’s bizarre in this scenario is that the husband-wife duo are obsessing over this necklace, saving and earning to purchase a necklace while their son is sitting at home as they are unable to “afford” to send him to school.  With all these bribes, one would think they would send their son to school instead of throwing money away on nonsense.

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The trio attend Anoushey’s brother’s wedding, where they come into contact with Shahwar once again, Danish immediately sensing his interest in Mehwish.  This makes him uncomfortable, along with the environment and society surrounding him, as Danish is a “simple” man.  Looking at the previews for the next episode, Mehwish’s behavior with Shahwar will lead to an intense argument.

Straight away, it must be discussed that there’s a strange lack of information regarding Danish and Mehwish’s marriage.  Their scenes at the wedding and Danish’s innocent questions regarding Anoushey, someone Mehwish describes as her “best friend,” felt rather “off” for a marriage of several years.  Assuming their son is 4 years old, they have been married for at least 5 years.  In a marriage that has lasted for 5 years, was a love marriage and has obvious affection in it, it’s simply poor writing to hear Danish asking so many questions about Anoushey (who he also refers to as “behnon jaisi”), questions that he should know the answers to.  The world of Danish and Mehwish is very insular with their home eerily quiet without any extended family members in the picture.  Other than the occasional mention of Danish’s father, who is his guideline for principled living, there is no mention or talk of family.  While this may not be a point to obsess over, it just seems lacking somehow and one is left wanting for more backstory on how Danish and Mehwish met, fell in love and got married, as it would add depth to the story.  At present, the story is interesting enough, but the writing will have to improve to give each character more depth and backstory in order for them to become more appealing.  At present, it feels as though viewers are reading a one-dimensional short story with limited information being given.

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