What Hollywood's Biggest Director Christopher Nolan Did in Bollywood

What Hollywood's Biggest Director Christopher Nolan Did in Bollywood

The filmmaker loves Indian cinema
What Hollywood's Biggest Director Christopher Nolan Did in Bollywood

Finally, famed Hollywood director Christopher Nolan (the man who made films like Inception, Intersteller, Dunkirk) kept his date with Mumbai and arrived with his team. Nolan is on a three-day trip to India aimed at drumming up support for shooting on film, as he did for his 2017 World War II epic “Dunkirk”, going against the trend in an industry which has widely embraced digital technology.

“Filmmaking is full of obstacles… it is not about being logical and pragmatic… it’s about magic, dreams, experiences and bracing your emotional side,” Nolan said after a roundtable dialogue in Mumbai. The 47-year-old Oscar-nominated director said he had “a very productive” meeting with members of Bollywood, the world’s largest film industry. “I am really trying to engage filmmakers in this conversation about how we can maintain, improve and continue to enjoy the celluloid photochemical analogue infrastructure for filmmaking,” Nolan said. “We are trying to preserve for future generation the history of films, especially the way the filmmakers originally intended to make the films in,” he added. Christopher Nolan has recently watched legendary filmmaker Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali and the ace Hollywood director says he is willing to learn more about Indian cinema. “I have had the pleasure of watching Mr Ray’s Pather Panchali recently, which I hadn’t seen before. I think it is one of the best films ever made. It is an extraordinary piece of work. I am interested in learning more about Indian film industry and that is the reason why I came.” The director filmed a pivotal sequence of his 2012 film The Dark Knight Rises in Jodhpur and he says, “I would love to come back to shoot for longer”.

Nolan, who shot his latest release Dunkirk on 65mm stock and has been vocal about his fondness for film as a medium, said it is important to preserve the traditional format for future generation.

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