102 Not Out Movie Review: Rishi Kapoor-Amitabh Bachchan's Film is a Heart-warming Watch

102 Not Out Movie Review: Rishi Kapoor-Amitabh Bachchan's Film is a Heart-warming Watch

Amitabh Bachchan and Rishi Kapoor's 102 Not Out is an enlightening take on relationship
102 Not Out Movie Review: Rishi Kapoor-Amitabh Bachchan's Film is a Heart-warming Watch

Starring - Amitabh Bachchan and Rishi Kapoor

Director - Umesh Shukla

Rating - 2.5

102 Not Out is a delightful take on how to live your life, irrespective of your age or situation. It's heartening to see how the filmmaker has shifted the focus from good looking young people to two old men who smile, laugh, cry and fight to put the message of the film across.

In fact some of the lines are cleverly written. For instance it implies an old man is the one who is not only scared of death but also of life. The film largely remains light hearted that works in favour of and against the film at the same time. Evoking occasional smiles, the film rarely stirs your soul with emotions or moves you to tears.

Dattatraya (Amitabh Bachchan) is a happy, free spirited 102 years old man whose sole purpose in life is to infuse fun in his grumpy son's (Baabu, Rishi Kapoor) daily routine, who over the years has lost hope and enthusiasm. The deal is simple; Dattatraya has a few tasks for Baabu that need to be all performed well or else he will be kicked out of the house. Err yeh film hain ki Roadies.

The first half of the film packs in a few unconvincing yet heart warming sequences that show the thereaputic role of nostalgia in our lives and how it's important to let go of people and our expectations of them. The second half though uses a property case as the final straw in Baabu's life that dilutes the flavour of the film. The sequences become long and the director idiot proofs everything, underlining every small little nuance in case we miss it.

The film revolves around 2 characters and both the men show us their credibility as actors. Amitabh Bachchan lands with most fun lines and does a fine job of them, however, becomes slightly annoying with his delivery. Surprisingly there were traces of Auro from Paa that I sensed in his potrayal of Dattatraya. Rishi Kapoor is on point as an old grumpy man, nailing the body language in the first half of the movie. He is real and relatable and his growth into a happy man is subtle. In two emotional scenes he manages to portray the agonies of Baabu so well that it might even make you emotional.

Jimit Trivedi plays Dhiru, an important character, who is the bridge between the audience and Baabu's past. Through him, Dattatraya speaks to us giving us insights into Baabu's life, explaining, almost justifying his grief. The narrative sounds a bit juvenile but Jimit as an actor really works. His take on bamboo plants is particularly funny.

102 Not Out is a fair attempt to put across the message of living one's life fully and embracing it till we die. Watch it with an elderly person in your family if you are not doing anything drastic this weekend.

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